Impact

Welcoming Erin Robinson and 2021 Momentum

Welcome! This blog post is also Openscapes’ first newsletter. If you’re interested in seeing these infrequent updates in your inbox, please sign up here (linked from the get involved page). A note from Julie: Welcoming Erin Robinson to Openscapes 2020 was a difficult year. I count myself fortunate that I was able to work remotely and that Openscapes was conceived as a remote-by-design initiative. The unexpected disruption of COVID-19 allowed 2020 to be a year that I worked on building Openscapes as a sustainable program so that we can mentor more researchers going forward.

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Incentivizing Open Science

In early November I had the honor to speak at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) Roundtable on Aligning Incentives for Open Science. This Roundtable has been convening thought leaders and stakeholders to identify the whats, whys, and hows of open science policies and incentives. I was invited to provide a researcher perspective and opinions on priorities for funding open science. The first part of this post is a summary of my talk.

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Plenary at the ESIP conference

In July 2020 I gave a plenary at the Earth Systems Information Partners (ESIP)’s Summer Meeting. ESIP is partnership of over 110 organizations supporting earth science data including NASA, USGS, and NOAA, and was created by NASA in 1998. This was an honor to present about Openscapes with this group and learn from this community about their work building and supporting data-driven communities. It was a really engaging remote conference experience.

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Our Openscapes experience: The Fay Lab

Ashleigh Novak is a spatial ecologist at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth’s School for Marine Science & Technology (SMAST), focused on integrating tagging data into stock assessments that inform fisheries management. As a technical associate with the Fay Lab, Ashleigh participated at our first in-person Openscapes Workshop at NOAA NEFSC in February 2020 and shares her experiences here. She notes below that “given the current, global situation of transitioning to at-home research, our lab is leaning on many of the tools and skills learned from Openscapes.

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Our first Openscapes Workshop

Last week Openscapes had its first-ever in-person 2-day workshop (the Champions Program is remote-by-design so this was an in-person adaptation). The workshop was at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) with six teams of fisheries scientists from NOAA’s Northeast Fisheries Science Center (NEFSC), Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute (WHOI), and University of Massachusetts Dartmouth’s School for Marine Science & Technology (SMAST). It was really wonderful to meet and work with these thoughtful scientists in person, and to see them leave the workshop energized to strengthen teamwork and community-based learning around open data science.

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rOpenSci's leadership in #rstats culture

Cross-posted on rOpenSci At their closing keynote at the 2020 RStudio Conference, Hilary Parker and Roger Peng mentioned that they hatched the idea for their excellent Not So Standard Deviations podcast following their reunion at the 2015 rOpenSci unconf, (“runconf15”). That statement went straight to my heart because it pin-pointed how I had been feeling throughout the week of RStudio Conference that I had been unable to name. At rstudio::conf, I was surrounded by so many of the incredible people I had met at that very same runconf15.

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How we work: the Buckley Lab

Dr. Lauren Buckley spent her fall sabbatical at NCEAS, where she chatted with Julie Lowndes about her lab practices and open data science. Here she shares how she is using practices from Openscapes in her own research group at the University of Washington. Learn more about her research at faculty.washington.edu/lbuckley. Thermal art of the Getty Museum by one of Dr. Buckley’s research initiatives @trenchproject.

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Openscapes 2020

Openscapes’ vision is a scientific culture that is more efficient and collaborative, and can uncover data-driven solutions faster. We engage and empower scientists with open data science, which not only increases transparency and reproducibility in science, but also enables kinder science. This is a brief recap of how we began doing this in 2019 and how we will continue in 2020. 2019 Review 2019 was a big year for Openscapes, full of firsts, excitement, and a lot of learning.

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Towards kinder science

Towards kinder science Earlier this week I published a piece in Scientific American called Open software means kinder science. It’s about how open source is not only good for science, it’s good for scientists. Having science be not only more transparent and reproducible but also more kind and inclusive is a huge part of what Openscapes is working towards. Art by Allison Horst Open science is not just about improving the way we share data and methods; it is also about improving the way we think, work and interact with each other.

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Supercharging research with open data science and teamwork

Supercharging research with open data science and teamwork Today we published a piece in Nature’s Career Column called Supercharge your research: A 10-week plan for open data science, and we are so thrilled to share this with the community. Co-authored with group leads from our inaugural Openscapes cohort – Halley Froehlich, Allison Horst, Nishad Jayasundara, Malin Pinsky, Adrian Stier, Nina Therkildsen, and Chelsea Wood – it really summarizes what we learned with the entire first cohort of Openscapes Champions and aims to welcome others to engage in open data science.

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