Art

Incentivizing Open Science

In early November I had the honor to speak at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) Roundtable on Aligning Incentives for Open Science. This Roundtable has been convening thought leaders and stakeholders to identify the whats, whys, and hows of open science policies and incentives. I was invited to provide a researcher perspective and opinions on priorities for funding open science. The first part of this post is a summary of my talk.

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Tidy data for efficiency, reproducibility, and collaboration

This illustrated series was a collaboration between Julie and Allison, who like to talk endlessly about data, code, teaching, open science, and art. We’ve been collaborating since the beginnings of Openscapes: Allison created all artwork for the Openscapes website and slides and was part of the inaugural Champions cohort. Here, we wanted these illustrations to tell a story about why tidy data is so powerful for efficiency, repeatability, and collaboration, but also stand alone to be most flexible for teaching.

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Plenary at the ESIP conference

In July 2020 I gave a plenary at the Earth Systems Information Partners (ESIP)’s Summer Meeting. ESIP is partnership of over 110 organizations supporting earth science data including NASA, USGS, and NOAA, and was created by NASA in 1998. This was an honor to present about Openscapes with this group and learn from this community about their work building and supporting data-driven communities. It was a really engaging remote conference experience.

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Better Data Management for Better Data Science

Cross-posted at emLab This is a guest post from Darcy Bradley, marine ecologist and Research Director of the Environmental Market Solution Lab’s Ocean Program at UC Santa Barbara. A leader in many realms, Darcy is thrilled to be a part of a community that celebrates open and reproducible data science; this post provides a glimpse into how she engaged that community to help her and her team improve project and data management for her research group.

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R for Excel Users Workshop

tl;dr: all workshop materials are available here: GitHub: https://github.com/rstudio-conf-2020/r-for-excel Book: https://rstudio-conf-2020.github.io/r-for-excel/ Slides Cross posted: https://education.rstudio.com/blog/2020/02/conf20-r-excel/ License: CC BY-SA 4.0 Background We were thrilled to co-teach the R for Excel Users workshop at rstudio::conf(2020)! From early on in our weekly early-morning work sessions and brainstorming hikes, we knew that our R for Excel Users workshop would not be about wholesale translating Excel operations into R. Instead, it would be a more holistic approach to reproducible analyses with R – a friendly introduction to becoming a modern R user.

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RStudio Conference 2020

Last week Openscapes went to the RStudio Conference! This is a brief summary of a conference that truly made history, both globally as RStudio announced it is a Public Benefit Corporation, and personally for me, since it marked five years of being part of the #rstats community. It is brief (and does not begin to provide a full summary!), but will be complemented by forthcoming blogs. Art played a big role at the conference.

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Keynote at the useR! conference

This article is cross-posted on medium.com In July 2019 I gave the opening keynote at the useR! Conference, the R language’s premiere gathering that has occurred annually throughout the world since 2004. It was, needless to say, an incredibly huge honor. And perhaps an unexpected one for a marine ecologist. But the R community has been so impactful on my science and life, and this was the opportunity to try to articulate its importance back to the community and to welcome others.

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Personifying code

Personifying code Anything and everything we do to increase visibility of open practices and data science within environmental science communities is important. When we see things, it is easier to value them. Openscapes Champion Allison Horst is doing this in part through her personifyr art series. She uses her art in the classroom at the University of California at Santa Barbara, where she is a lecturer of data science and statistics in an environmentally-focused graduate program, the Bren School of Environmental Science & Management.

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