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3 approaches for the year of open science

At the 2023 ESIP Winter Meeting, “Opening Doors to Open Science”, we held a session called “Better Science for Future Us: Openscapes stories and approaches for the Year of Open Science” with speakers from University of North Carolina (UNC), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Fisheries, California Water Boards, NASA’s National Snow and Ice Data Center, and NASA’s Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center. The goals of this session were to hear from and boost a diverse set of leaders from across the US government and academia to highlight open science in daily work, including peer-teaching, mentoring, and learning.

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Openscapes Newsletter #6: Winter 2023

Openscapes Newsletter #6: Winter 2023 Welcome to Openscapes’ sixth newsletter! If you’re interested in seeing these infrequent updates in your inbox, please sign up here (linked from our get involved page). Hello! As we continue into 2023, we at Openscapes continue to come back to the core of what we do: we engage, empower, and amplify. Whether it is with tech like Quarto and JupyterHubs or communities like R-Ladies, Ladies of Landsat, Black in Marine Science, and NASA Earthdata, it’s about welcoming folks to better ways of working and open science.

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Impacts of Openscapes Training on Open Science Movement Building Inside NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center

In Fall 2022, Openscapes ran four concurrent Champions Cohorts that included participants from all NOAA Fisheries Science Centers, described in Nationwide Openscapes Training At NOAA Fisheries Science Centers: Facilitating Collaboration, Skill-Sharing, and Open Science. This post is the executive summary shared with Alaska Fisheries Science Center (AFSC) leadership of the work and experiences of AFSC research staff participants. Update February 21, 2023 *See also: 2022 Fall Openscapes Champion Cohort Makes Inroads to Open Science, NOAA Fisheries Feature Story AFSC supported 8 teams from across the center in the 2022 Fall Openscapes Cohort of the Openscapes Champions training program.

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Nationwide Openscapes Training at NOAA Fisheries Science Centers: Facilitating Collaboration, Skill-sharing, and Open Science

This blog post is co-written by NOAA Fisheries research staff who are Openscapes Mentors who supported colleagues during our four concurrent Champions Cohorts in Fall 2022. We’ll share what we did across all four Cohorts, as well as specific stories from each Cohort! We’ve also been building resources for NOAA Fisheries and beyond: https://nmfs-openscapes.github.io/ https://nmfs-opensci.github.io/ResourceBook/ https://rverse-tutorials.github.io/ Background: How NOAA Fisheries Openscapes Cohorts Worked From October-December 2022, over 150 staff from six NOAA Fisheries Science Centers and two Regional Offices, as well as from the Office of Science and Technology participated in the Openscapes Champions Program, a professional development training program for transforming analytical workflows with open science.

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Open Science for the Climate Movement, a chat with Dr Monica Granados

Reimagining open science as part of the climate movement Our 7th Openscapes Community Call featured a “celebrity interview” with Monica Granados, PhD. Monica is the Open Climate Campaign Manager at Creative Commons and on the Leadership team of PREreview. She is an open science specialist and a trained ecologist. Monica was interviewed by Julie Lowndes, PhD, Openscapes Director. Watch the recording on Openscapes YouTube. In this conversation, we dug into what each of us can do to connect our daily work to the climate movement.

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NASA Openscapes: efforts to support end users in the journey to the cloud

We are a mentor community across NASA Earth science data centers (Distributed Active Archive Centers - DAACs). We are co-creating and teaching common tutorials to support researchers as they migrate analytical workflows to the Cloud. We presented at several workshops and events this fall, including a 25-minute talk at NASA EOSDIS Systems Engineering Technical Interchange Meeting (SE TIM) that we reused at NASA’s Open Source Science Data Repositories (OSSDR) Workshop.

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Sound Bytes: Championing Open Science

This blog post is authored by Kourtney Burger and is cross-posted from the NOAA Fisheries Science blog. Kourtney works as a biological science technician with the SWFSC Acoustic Ecology Lab. She is responsible for the lab’s data management and general lab management and maintenance. Her current research interests include using passive acoustics monitoring as a non-invasive way to study marine mammals in their natural environments. When Kourtney’s not working, you can find her spending time outdoors and hanging out with her dog.

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Adapting the Champions Program for the California Water Boards

Note: Openscapes began to work with and onboard mentors over the summer of 2021 while also beginning writing the Openscapes Approach Guide to help document our process. This post focuses on what the California Water Boards mentors learned in 2022 as they led their own Cohort in the agency. This was the first Cohort to be “independently led” by mentors within their own agency, we hope the first of many!

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The why, what, and how of our NASA Openscapes cloud infrastructure: 2i2c JupyterHub and corn environment

The why, what, and how of our NASA Openscapes cloud infrastructure: 2i2c JupyterHub and corn environment I am a software engineer at the National Snow and Ice Data Center. Last month I gave a casual overview of our current cloud infrastructure set up with NASA Openscapes. The purpose was to share the why, what, and how of our setup with 2i2c JupyterHub and corn, to see how we can reuse what works and improve from other ideas.

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Vacationing with Open Science

I’ve just taken a 2+ week vacation and truly unplugged. While this post seems a bit personal for the Openscapes blog, I wanted to share a bit about how our open science process made it possible, because one of the things we hear often from researchers is that they feel like they can’t take vacation - too much rests solely on their shoulders, solely on their laptops. And I have felt this way too, which was one reason why time off was a long time coming.

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